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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP) Via Zoom


Credit Available - See Credits tab below.

Average Rating:
Not yet rated
Faculty:
Sharon Birman |  Marjorie Weinstock |  Lisa French
Course Levels:
Intermediate
Duration:
17 Hours
Media Type:
Classroom
License:
Access for 90 day(s) after purchase.


Description

This intensive 2-day module provides training in the assessment and treatment of suicidal ideation and behavior.  Participants will receive in-depth training in cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention and will have the opportunity to practice assessment and intervention strategies.  Video demonstrations and participant role-plays will be used in class to practice key assessment and treatment techniques. The module lays the foundation for working with suicidal patients by providing a detailed review of the epidemiology of suicide both in the civilian population and within the military/veteran community. Participants will be introduced to the Self-Directed Violence Classification System (SDVCS), a nomenclature supported by the DoD/VA for self-directed violence and suicidal behavior. In addition, a review of several theories of suicide will be covered as well as a risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior.  The module is designed for behavioral health providers working with Service members and Veterans who are seeking in-depth training in empirically supported treatment options they can immediately incorporate into their clinical practice.  The training will provide hands on practice activities and is geared towards an actively involved audience through discussion and in workshop activities.  Participants must attend both days, as the course material is cumulative.

 

Attendees must participate using a separate computer rather than joining a group of people viewing via one machine to acquire credit for attendance.

 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Differentiate between rates of suicide in civilian and military populations and identify the clinical implications of these differences.
  • Categorize suicidal and non-suicidal thoughts and behaviors in relation to clinical assessment.
  • Communicate several warning signs for suicide that inform decisions about clinical interventions.
  • Apply at least one psychological theory of suicide to the process of clinical assessment and treatment planning.
  • Incorporate suicide risk and protective factors unique to military populations into overall risk assessment for suicide.
  • Scrutinize unique challenges associated with suicide risk assessment and prediction in the clinical setting.
  • Assess risk for suicide in a manner that is sensitive to both proximal and distal risk factors.
  • Collaborate with a patient to complete a safety plan.
  • Use means safety counseling in patient interactions to improve clinical outcomes.
  • Create a timeline of a patient's suicidal crisis for use in treatment.
  • Evaluate key negative thoughts associated with the intent to die by suicide as related to clinical practice.
  • Apply CBT formulation of suicide using the expanded case conceptualization model of the suicidal crisis.
  • Implement cognitive, behavioral and affective coping strategies utilized in CBT-SP to help patients cope with suicide urges.
  • Characterize the modifications to standard behavioral activation when applied within the CBT-SP protocol.
  • Utilize the guided imagery exercise as part of the relapse prevention protocol for CBT-SP.

Agenda:

 

Day One
1100 1130 Check-In
1130 1145 Introduction & Course Overview
1145 – 1215 Epidemiology of Suicide
1215 – 1245 Nomenclature
1245 – 1315 Risk and Protective Factors
1315 – 1330 Co-Morbid Conditions
1330 – 1345 Break
1345 – 1410 Theoretical Underpinnings: Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide Risk – Dr. Thomas Joiner
1410 – 1430 Theoretical Underpinnings: Three-Step Theory of Suicide – Drs. David Klonsky and Alexis May
1430 – 1500 The Case of Katrina
1500 – 1520 Cognitive Therapy for Suicide Prevention – Empirical Support for CBT
1520 – 1620 Lunch
1620 –  1700 Intro to Cognitive Therapy for Suicide Prevention
   Theory of CBT
   Structure of treatment
   Session structure
1700 – 1710 CBT for Suicide Prevention, Early Phase of Treatment – Overview
1710 – 1730 Fluid Vulnerability Theory
1730 – 1745 Break
1745 – 1825 CBT for Suicide Prevention, Early Phase of Treatment –
   Conducting a Suicide Risk Assessment
   Suicide Risk Assessment Role Play
   Suicide Risk Assessment Template
   Suicide Risk Continuum
1925 – 1955 Narrative Description
1955 – 2000 Questions and wrap-up
2000 Adjourn

 


Day Two
1100 – 1130 Check-In
1130 – 1200 Nomenclature Homework Review
1200 – 1245 Crisis Intervention
   Hospitalization
   Safety Planning
   Hope Box
1245 – 1345 Means Safety/Means Restriction Counseling
1345 – 1400 Break
1400 – 1430 Constructing a Timeline
1430 – 1515 Treatment Planning and Cognitive Case Conceptualization
1515 – 1615 Lunch
1615 – 1730 Intermediate Phase of Treatment
   Behavioral Strategies
   Coping Strategies
1730 – 1745 Break
1745 – 1845 Intermediate Phase of Treatment Continued 
Cognitive Strategies
1845 – 1945 Later Phase of Treatment –
   Review and Consolidation of Skills
   Relapse Prevention
   Review of Goals and Treatment Planning
1945 – 2000 Questions
2000 Adjourn

 

This activity is approved for 13.5 continuing education credits (CEs)

 

The Center for Deployment Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Center for Deployment Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Credits


American Psychological Association (APA)

The Center for Deployment Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Center for Deployment Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.



Faculty

Sharon Birman's Profile

Sharon Birman Related seminars and products: 3

Psy.D., Cognitive Behavior Therapy Trainer

Center for Deployment Psychology


Sharon Birman, Psy.D., is a CBT trainer working with the Military Training Programs at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland.  She joined the CDP in 2014 after completing her postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, where she was actively involved in CBT and DBT intervention, supervision and education.  She completed her predoctoral internship at Didi Hirsch Mental Health Center, focusing her training suicide prevention and evidence-based interventions for the treatment of individuals with severe, chronic mental illness. 

Dr. Birman received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Southern California and her master’s and doctorate degrees in clinical psychology from Pepperdine University.

Her professional interests are in the areas of intervention and treatment planning for severe and chronic mental illness, suicide prevention, social justice, multicultural and diversity issues in therapy.  She has received intensive training in CBT and DBT in a variety of contexts, including hospital setting, community mental health centers, Veterans Affairs and within an applied research lab.  She has also received training in Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), among other therapeutic modalities. She is certified in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Applied Suicide Intervention Skills (ASIST), and Brief Response to Crisis (BRC). 

Financial: Sharon Birman has no relevant financial relationship to disclose

Nonfinancial: Sharon Birman has no relevant nonfinancial relationship to disclose


Marjorie Weinstock's Profile

Marjorie Weinstock Related seminars and products: 1

Senior Military Behavioral Health Psychologist

11223 - Center for Deployment Psychology


Marjorie Weinstock, Ph.D. is a Senior Military Behavioral Health Psychologist at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. She joined the CDP in 2009 as a Deployment Behavioral Health Psychologist at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Prior to joining the CDP, Dr. Weinstock spent three years working for the Navy’s Fleet & Family Support Program, where she provided counseling services to military members and their families.

Dr. Weinstock is a graduate of Emory University and received her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University at Buffalo. She completed her internship at the Brockton, Massachusetts VA Medical Center and a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in clinical research and addictive disorders at the Brown University Training Consortium.

As the spouse of a recently retired Service member, Dr. Weinstock has a first-hand understanding of the demands of military service on the family. In her current role she is engaged in the development and presentation of trainings for behavioral health clinicians to improve their competency in working with both Service members and their families. Her professional interests include deployment-related mental health issues, cognitive behavioral therapy, suicide prevention, and the impact of military life on the family.

Financial: Marjorie Weinstock is employed by Center for Deployment Psychology.

Non-financial: Marjorie Weinstock has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose. 


Lisa French's Profile

Lisa French Related seminars and products: 1

Psy.D., Chief of Staff

Center for Deployment Psychology


Lisa French, Psy.D., is the Chief of Staff at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. She joined the CDP in 2011 as a deployment behavioral health psychologist at Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center. Prior to joining the CDP, Dr. French served on active duty as a psychologist in the United States Air Force (USAF) from 2002-2011. In 2006, she deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Dr. French received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Oregon State University and her master’s and doctorate degrees in clinical psychology from Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. She is a 2003 graduate of the Wright-Patterson USAF Medical Center Psychology Residency Program.

As a military spouse, Dr. French continues to experience military life daily and has first-hand understanding of the demands of military service on the family. Her professional interests include dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatment approaches, the impact of military life on the family, and suicide prevention and treatment.

Financial: Lisa French is employed by Center for Deployment Psychology.

Non-financial: Lisa French has no relevant non-financial relationships to disclose. 


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